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Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?



 
 
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  #61  
Old February 19th 18, 01:23 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
ultred ragnusen
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Posts: 54
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

wrote:

>> That's strange that Europeans use a half-metric half-what-you-call-Imperial
>> standard of units.

>
> Not necessarily the rest of Europe but the UK.


Do the Germans and French also use "inch" sizes for their ratchets?

> We only say gallons BUT when talking to the ex-colonies we have to say
> 'Imperial' because your pints and gallons are different from ours.
>
> 1 imperial (UK) pint = 1.2 US pint
> 1 imperial (UK) gallon = 1.2 US gallons


I see. Like you, we only speak of "gallons", where we don't ever need to
distinguish between your gallons and our gallons, I guess.
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  #62  
Old February 19th 18, 01:38 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
alan_m
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Posts: 32
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

On 19/02/2018 00:23, ultred ragnusen wrote:
> wrote:
>
>>> That's strange that Europeans use a half-metric half-what-you-call-Imperial
>>> standard of units.

>>
>> Not necessarily the rest of Europe but the UK.

>
> Do the Germans and French also use "inch" sizes for their ratchets?


I believe it's an international standard with no metric equivalents for
the "drive" side of sockets.


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  #63  
Old February 19th 18, 02:00 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Dave Plowman (News)
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Posts: 1,533
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

In article >,
Dean Hoffman > wrote:
> The only British car I see in the mid USA is the Mini.


Wot - no Range Rovers? Jaguars? Nissans?

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Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #64  
Old February 19th 18, 02:08 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Dave Plowman (News)
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Posts: 1,533
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

In article >,
Sanity Clause > wrote:
> Back to the actual question: 3-inch extension keeps you close to the
> nut, unlikely to twist sideways and fall off. 16-inch extension has the
> possibility of pulling the socket out of alignment, maybe rounding off
> the nut, and scraping your knuckles (and your shiny new wrench) on the
> ground, UNLESS you properly support the wrench at the head end to keep
> it straight.


If you have a spare jack, place it under the extension bar to reduce
sideways load on the socket. You can then use your full body weight on the
breaker bar with less chance of breaking the tools.

--
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Dave Plowman London SW
To e-mail, change noise into sound.
  #65  
Old February 19th 18, 02:26 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Dean Hoffman[_5_]
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Posts: 24
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

On 2/18/18 7:00 PM, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:
> In article >,
> Dean Hoffman > wrote:
>> The only British car I see in the mid USA is the Mini.

>
> Wot - no Range Rovers? Jaguars? Nissans?
>

Shucks. I forgot. I actually know someone who has a Range Rover.
There was a Jag convertible around for awhile but I haven't seen it
for years.
Nissans are Japanese, Mexican, or American made at least for the North
American market.
  #66  
Old February 19th 18, 02:50 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Clare Snyder
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Posts: 70
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 09:00:02 -0800, ultred ragnusen
> wrote:

> wrote:
>
>>>First question is what is the practical difference between these three 21mm
>>>(13/16ths) "sockets" for the lug bolts on the car I was working on today?
>>>http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/17/socket_ends.jpg
>>>1. The standard lug wrench (green) has 6 points, each at a sharp angle.
>>>2. The impact socket (black) has 6 points, each at a semicircular angle.
>>>3. The standard socket (chrome) has 12 points, each at a sharp angle.

>>
>> The impact socket is superior for that application - whether using an
>> impact driver or not. A 12 point socket is better in situations where
>> fine motion is required.

>
>This is good to know that the impact socket is superior, probably for two
>reasons, right?
>1. It has those radius corners (someone said it reduces stress on both the
>nuts and the socket itself).
>2. It is stronger overall (presumably)
>
>Since there is always a drawback, I think the drawback might be:
>3. They're "fatter" it seems, than my normal sockets
>4. They don't seem to come in 12-point sizes (at least mine aren't)


That's because 12 point sockets are not the best to use on an impact
- as discussed previously.

And yes, they ARE fatter - because they REALLY need to be.
  #67  
Old February 19th 18, 02:52 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Clare Snyder
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Posts: 70
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 15:28:22 -0600, Dean Hoffman
> wrote:

>On 2/18/18 3:17 PM, ultred ragnusen wrote:
>
>> With respect to the country of origin of most cars driven in America,
>> I'd wager that Japan has the rest of the world beat in terms of what
>> 'mericans prefer overall. b

> The only British car I see in the mid USA is the Mini. There are
>lots of cars with Japanese badges around. Some of those are built
>in the US though. Supposedly US vehicles might be built in Canada
>or Mexico.



Or Korea if it wears a bow-tie.
  #68  
Old February 19th 18, 02:55 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
Fredxx
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Posts: 8
Default Gay ****** Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson" LOL), theSociopathic Attention Whore

On 18/02/2018 23:43, Peeler wrote:
> On Sun, 18 Feb 2018 23:20:31 +0000, Fredxx, the resident smartass,
> smartassed again:
>
>>> ROTFLOL! And Birdbrain, the resident gay ****** of all the UK ngs, quickly
>>> hides behind his ridiculous pretend killfile again! ****ing HILARIOUS! LOL
>>>
>>> I sure hope that eventually all of your neighbours and relatives will learn
>>> about your "reputation" on these groups, Peter Hucker, you filthy
>>> sociopathic ******! LOL

>>
>> ROTFLOL! And Peeler, Birdbrain's jilted lover, is jealous all that spunk
>> is going to waste.

>
> You felt personally addressed when "gay ******" was mentioned? Obviously
> RIGHTLY so, you smartass who can never hold back his gay fantasies! <BG>


I didn't feel addressed, and I don't feel the need to dribble over
PHucker's every post.

> Remember, gay smartass: you, TOO, claimed to have "killfiled" me! ROTFLOL


Unfortunately not in uk.rec.cars.maintenance but is easily remedied.

  #69  
Old February 19th 18, 03:17 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
micky
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Posts: 356
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 17:42:55 +0000, MrCheerful
> wrote:

>On 18/02/2018 17:00, ultred ragnusen wrote:
>> wrote:
>>
>>>> First question is what is the practical difference between these three 21mm
>>>> (13/16ths) "sockets" for the lug bolts on the car I was working on today?
>>>> http://wetakepic.com/images/2018/02/17/socket_ends.jpg
>>>> 1. The standard lug wrench (green) has 6 points, each at a sharp angle.
>>>> 2. The impact socket (black) has 6 points, each at a semicircular angle.
>>>> 3. The standard socket (chrome) has 12 points, each at a sharp angle.
>>>
>>> The impact socket is superior for that application - whether using an
>>> impact driver or not. A 12 point socket is better in situations where
>>> fine motion is required.

>>
>> This is good to know that the impact socket is superior, probably for two
>> reasons, right?
>> 1. It has those radius corners (someone said it reduces stress on both the
>> nuts and the socket itself).
>> 2. It is stronger overall (presumably)
>>
>> Since there is always a drawback, I think the drawback might be:
>> 3. They're "fatter" it seems, than my normal sockets
>> 4. They don't seem to come in 12-point sizes (at least mine aren't)
>>

>
>I use single hex impact sockets for 99.9 percent of jobs, there are
>practically speaking no occasions when they are too fat to get
>somewhere. (better makes are thinner sided than cheap ones)
>
>Unless you have 12 sided nuts/bolts, then you do not need 12 sided
>sockets (there are some odd cars/equipment which use 12 sided hardware)


I think the only time I ever saw that was on the fuel pump bolts on a
'67 Pontiac. I wondered why there of all places.
  #70  
Old February 19th 18, 03:25 AM posted to alt.home.repair,rec.autos.tech,uk.rec.cars.maintenance
micky
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Posts: 356
Default Can you teach me more about lug bolts & related tire tools?

In alt.home.repair, on Sun, 18 Feb 2018 17:52:28 +0000, MrCheerful
> wrote:

>On 18/02/2018 17:10, ultred ragnusen wrote:
>> wrote:
>>
>>> He could be referencing the special torque bars that are used by many
>>> tire shops. They look like an extension bar, but they come in
>>> different thicknesses and are color coded to indicate the torque which
>>> can be applied using each one.

>>
>> I just mean the right-angle simple bar extension that you have to have in
>> order to keep the torque wrench away from the sidewall of the tire.
>>
>> You have to have an extension no matter what, because the torque wrench
>> hits the tire sidewall because the lug nuts are on the hub but the tire
>> sidewall sticks out a few inches.
>>
>> Even a deep socket isn't long enough, so the least I can add by way of
>> extension is a deep socket plus a 2 or 3 inch extension bar (whatever I
>> have that is shortest).
>>
>> I was asking if I used a 3 inch extension bar off the deep socket, or, if I
>> used a 6 inch extension bar, would it matter for the torque?
>>
>> I think not - but I've heard people say use the shortest extension bar you
>> can get your hands on. I don't understand why. It should be the same torque
>> if I used a 16-inch extension bar, right?
>>

>
>no because some force will just be twisting the bar, Imagine a bar a
>mile long, you twist one end with a known force, the other end would not
>move.


But the extension is not a mile long and anything lost in twisting a 10"
extension is too small to measure. However if you have the extension so
it's tipped a little, not in line with the axis of the nut/bolt, then
some torque is not in the direction of turning the nut, and the longer
the extension, the more is lost. This happens when the socket is loose
on the nut, not especially lug nuts.

 




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