A Cars forum. AutoBanter

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » AutoBanter forum » Auto newsgroups » Technology
Site Map Home Register Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

hI aLL! what lateral g-force can old cars achieve?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 22nd 20, 07:13 PM posted to rec.autos.tech
longtrennguoi
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default hI aLL! what lateral g-force can old cars achieve?

A modern vanilla sedan can do 0.9 g, maybe more with good tyres.
I saw a video on Youtube of some guy fitting a triangulated 4-link
suspension
to some chrome-bumper car, and managed to get 0.52 g on cornering,
which seems rather poor. Must have had sh*t tyres. Sorry, I haven't
been
able to find it again to get the details.

Ads
  #2  
Old May 23rd 20, 12:10 AM posted to rec.autos.tech
Scott Dorsey
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,869
Default hI aLL! what lateral g-force can old cars achieve?

longtrennguoi > wrote:
>A modern vanilla sedan can do 0.9 g, maybe more with good tyres.


Oh, you should be able to get it to do about 50g if you T-bone it at
highway speed.
--scott


--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #3  
Old May 23rd 20, 05:25 AM posted to rec.autos.tech
Xeno
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 320
Default hI aLL! what lateral g-force can old cars achieve?

On 23/5/20 4:13 am, longtrennguoi wrote:
> A modern vanilla sedan can do 0.9 g, maybe more with good tyres.
> I saw a video on Youtube of some guy fitting a triangulated 4-link
> suspension
> to some chrome-bumper car, and managed to get 0.52 g on cornering,
> which seems rather poor. Must have had sh*t tyres. Sorry, I haven't
> been
> able to find it again to get the details.
>

Depending on the type of tyres, 0.7g really pulls it up. At 0.75g, with
balanced slip angles, you're into a 4 wheel slide. Look into slip angles
for answers to your question. The tyre is, in most instances, the
primary determinant. The cornering force developed by a tyre in any
scenario depends on slip angle, load, inflation pressure, camber angle,
drive forces and braking forces.

Modern cars have very much improved tyres and suspension handling
dynamics but I very much doubt you'll be getting 0.9g with *any* modern
vanilla sedan because - physics.

--

Xeno


Nothing astonishes Noddy so much as common sense and plain dealing.
(with apologies to Ralph Waldo Emerson)
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
what lateral g-force can old cars achieve? [email protected] Technology 1 August 21st 18 04:45 PM
Why highways move more swiftly when you force cars to crawl along at55 mph. gpsman Driving 144 November 19th 11 05:46 AM
EU to ban petrol and diesel cars from cities to force drivers togo 'green' Lil Abner Driving 0 March 29th 11 03:51 AM
Lateral force on wheels - friction Wrza Simulators 5 August 31st 06 05:51 PM
Car Physics: Lateral force sign Sina Tootoonian Simulators 0 July 13th 05 07:17 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2020 AutoBanter.
The comments are property of their posters.